Strengths Coaching Blog

Friday, September 22, 2017

BP10 Quarterly Update - Called to Coach S5E29

On a recent BP10 Quarterly Update, we spoke with Gallup Global Channel Leader, Entrepreneurship and Job Creation, Todd Johnson.




The BP10 just passed 100,000 completes. It’s not 17 million like the CliftonStrengths assessment, but we’re on our way! About 60,000 of the 100,000 completes are students, with over 20 countries participating. We’re going to start running frequencies on the BP10 completes, we’ll be looking at prevalence. What is the number one builder talent? What is the most rare? Stay tuned for more data on that.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

Builder Talent in Action: Will This Disruptor Solve America’s Job Problems?

By Jessica Buono

Have you ever heard of a job factory?

You will soon. 


Jason Walker will change the world. He can’t help but take ideas and transform them into something valuable. He continuously seeks out and discovers novel solutions and new paths that anticipate the needs of communities, businesses and customers. 

Jason pushes beyond boundaries in ways that others would never imagine, and he’s good at it.

You see, Jason is a Disruptor. And job factories and corporate venture factories are his latest disruptions.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Analytical: The Insistence that Theories be Sound - Theme Thursday Season 3

On this Theme Thursday Season Three webcast, Jim Collison, Gallup's Director of Talent Sourcing, and Maika Leibbrandt, Senior Workplace Consultant, talk about Analytical with Gallup's Benjamin Erikson-Farr. 





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Your Analytical theme challenges other people: “Prove it. Show me why what you are claiming is true.” In the face of this kind of questioning, some will find that their brilliant theories wither and die. For you, this is precisely the point. You do not necessarily want to destroy other people’s ideas, but you do insist that their theories be sound. You see yourself as objective and dispassionate. You like data because they are value free. They have no agenda. Armed with these data, you search for patterns and connections. 

You want to understand how certain patterns affect one another. How do they combine? What is their outcome? Does this outcome fit with the theory being offered or the situation being confronted? These are your questions. You peel the layers back until, gradually, the root cause or causes are revealed. Others see you as logical and rigorous. Over time, they will come to you in order to expose someone’s “wishful thinking” or “clumsy thinking” to your refining mind. It is hoped that your analysis is never delivered too harshly. Otherwise, others may avoid you when that “wishful thinking” is their own.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Coaching Q&A With Dean Jones - Called to Coach S5E27

On a recent Called to Coach, we spoke with Gallup's Talent Development Architect, Dean Jones.






Dean Jones is the principal architect of Gallup's global client learning strategy. Dean consults with clients on strategic solutions to address key business issues, including organizational development, performance management, learning and development, productivity and workforce effectiveness.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Mastery Monday: Understanding Context

By Albert L. Winseman, D.Min


Woman looking back in a rearview mirror. Where have we been? What has worked before? What hasn’t? How did we get here? Are there prior best practices we can implement? These are all questions individuals high in Context are likely to ask. Context focuses on understanding the past in order to make sense of the present, and to chart a course forward. Those with strong Context talents are very likely to enjoy history, look to the “blueprints,” and become wiser about the future because they understand the past.

In this installment of Compare and Contrast, I examine the differences and similarities between Context and Analytical, Connectedness, and Restorative.

Thursday, September 14, 2017

Positive Psychology in Practice: Each Moment Matters

By Tim Simon


In 2004, Gallup published the book How Full Is Your Bucket? The book was a collaboration between Don Clifton and his grandson, Tom Rath.

In the book, Don and Tom discuss the importance of everyday interactions and how increasing the positive interactions can make a big difference in a person’s life, stressing that, “Positive emotions are essential daily requirements for survival.” Essential daily requirements. It almost sounds like a slogan for a daily vitamin. But this statement is grounded in years of solid research, beginning with Don’s work at the University of Nebraska in the 1950s and continuing today with hundreds of scientists around the globe.    

Daniel Kahneman, a Nobel Prize recipient and Gallup Senior Scientist Emeritus, suggests that each day, we experience approximately 20,000 moments. A “moment” is defined as a few seconds when our brains record an experience. The moments that stay with us are either positive or negative -- usually not neutral. While we cannot take time to analyze each moment of our life, we could consciously begin to practice the art of increasing the number of positive interactions each day. Think about how just one positive interaction can turn your day around. Think about how these daily interactions can change your life and those you connect with.

Monday, September 11, 2017

Mastery Monday: Understanding Analytical

By Albert L. Winseman, D.Min


Analytical Magnifying Glass
Analytical is what I call a “questioning” theme – people high in Analytical tend to ask a lot of questions. The questions they ask are most likely of the “prove it to me” variety:  “Where did you get that information? What does the data say? Have you done your homework? What are your sources? What is the evidence to back it up? How do you know this will work?” Analytical focuses on the facts, figures, data, and evidence to come to conclusions and find patterns. Before acting, individuals with Analytical in their Top Five will weigh the evidence, study the data, and make an informed decision – then take action. Sound thinking is the hallmark of Analytical, and objectivity is the goal.

In this installment of Compare and Contrast, I will explore the similarities and differences between Analytical and Strategic, Learner, and Focus.

Friday, September 8, 2017

Executive Coaching - Called to Coach S5E26

On a recent Called to Coach, we spoke with Gallup-Certified Strengths Coach, Glenn Williams.






Glenn Williams is the CEO and founder of Outward Looking International (OLI), a leadership consulting company which he launched in 2010. Glenn spent more than 25 years as a psychologist and an executive across 40 countries before starting OLI. OLI's mission is to change the ways leaders think and behave in regards to performance. Glenn's top five strengths are Learner, Arranger, Strategic, Achiever and Responsibility.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Relator: Cultivating Relationships with Depth and Longevity - Theme Thursday Season 3

On this Theme Thursday Season Three webcast, Jim Collison, Gallup's Director of Talent Sourcing, and Maika Leibbrandt, Senior Workplace Consultant, talk about Relator with guest Ryan Salvanera. 





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Relator describes your attitude toward your relationships. In simple terms, the Relator theme pulls you toward people you already know. You do not necessarily shy away from meeting new people — in fact, you may have other themes that cause you to enjoy the thrill of turning strangers into friends — but you do derive a great deal of pleasure and strength from being around your close friends. You are comfortable with intimacy. Once the initial connection has been made, you deliberately encourage a deepening of the relationship.

You want to understand their feelings, their goals, their fears and their dreams, and you want them to understand yours. You know that this kind of closeness implies a certain amount of risk — you might be taken advantage of — but you are willing to accept that risk. For you, a relationship has value only if it is genuine. And the only way to know that is to entrust yourself to the other person. The more you share with each other, the more you risk together. The more you risk together, the more each of you proves your caring is genuine. These are your steps toward real friendship, and you take them willingly

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