Strengths Coaching Blog

Friday, February 26, 2016

Why I Practice Strengths-Based Parenting

by Bryant Ott
 
James and Dad
 James just won’t stop talking. Saying what’s on his mind. Speaking on behalf of his action figures or animal toys. Asking questions -- my goodness, the questions.


He’s only 4½ years old, but ever since he was 2, his mother and I have marveled at his ability to communicate. Don’t take the proud parents’ words for it, though. Ask his teachers, his extended family, even the waitresses at our neighborhood pizza place who get more than they bargained for when they strike up small talk with James. The kid was born to communicate.

I know James is unique, sure. But I’m also certain that his particular talent for talking to anyone, about anything, at any time, is distinctive. Don’t get me wrong. I know other kids have it too. But I’m not those kids’ dad. I know that James’ talents for relating to and communicating with others are special because understanding those talents, and how they relate to his other natural abilities, allows me to parent him the way I do.

Thursday, February 25, 2016

[Arranger S2] Turning Chaos into Progress


On this Theme Thursday Season Two webcast, Jim Collison, Gallup's Director of Talent Sourcing, and Maika Leibbrandt, Gallup Advanced Learning and Development Consultant discussed the theme of Arranger.





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Maika explained, "Arranger has the ability to hold a dozen ping pong balls under water at the same time." A person talented in the Arranger theme can see the chaos in a situation ad bring it together into a cohesive production. Arranger takes a mess at turn it into order -- and that happens in real time. That is, Arranger lives in the moment and can fix a problem right now. Maika likes to think about a bunch of gears that are all turning, but that aren't touching and pushing each other forward. An Arranger can bring those gears together so their teeth touch and they move in harmony and with more productivity. Arranger puts the pieces together in the most efficient way possible. 



Wednesday, February 24, 2016

[Recap] Clifton StrengthsFinder is a Treasure for Identifying Talent

On a recent Called to Coach: Singapore/Australia Edition, we spoke with Gallup-Certified Strengths Coach, Taisja Laudy.









A few years ago, Taisja was working as a successful sales director. She constantly searched for tools to improve her team members' engagement at work. Taisja wanted them to be happy and fulfilled in all aspects of their lives. She explained this desire to her pastor: that she had a calling to help others. Her pastor recommended that she look at Clifton StrengthsFinder to help her team become happier. He explained that StrengthsFinder identifies a person's talents and is frequently used by executives. Taisja was so excited by her conversation with her pastor that she went home and immediately took the Clifton StrengthsFinder assessment. Also, Taisja downloaded every available press book. She explained, "I knew I was holding a treasure."  

Sunday, February 21, 2016

[GWSW] Command: The Power to Persuade and Inspire Others

Command brings decisiveness and emotional clarity. They have the ability to bring to light what is often avoided or unstated. This gives them the ability to resolve conflicts and misunderstandings. Command falls into the Influencing domain, which reflects its power to persuade people. Individuals with high Command like to be in control of situations. They tend to be highly assertive and thrive in opportunities when they can take charge. Command is as an energizing, persuasive, and inspirational theme.



Please register for our Command Webcast on Thursday, February 25, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. EST. Download the Theme Thursday Companion Guide on Command here to follow along with the show!









Friday, February 19, 2016

Using Clifton StrengthsFinder to Create and Accomplish Resolutions

By Tonya Fredstrom

The best resolutions aren’t just informed by your talents, they’re kept by your talents, too! Here’s how it works for me.

My top five Clifton StrengthsFinder themes are Maximizer, Strategic, Achiever, Learner and Individualization. Given these, everything for me is about improvement. I’m all about getting that little bit more out of everything (Maximizer). And the first place I focus my attention is on myself. How can I continue to grow into my best self today, tomorrow and throughout the year? To get the wheels turning, I use the five essential elements of well-being based on Gallup’s research. These elements are: Career , Social, Financial , Physical and Community Well-Being. Across each of those elements, I ask myself, “What is one thing I want to specifically start or continue doing that will move me forward in my desire to be my best self?”

Thursday, February 18, 2016

[Recap] Q12 and Strengths Boost Engagement and Productivity

On a recent Called to Coach, we spoke with Gallup-Certified Strengths Coach, Ryan Houmand.










Ryan was in a management position in "Corporate America" for almost 20 years. He explained that during the last four years, "If it weren't for the money, I would do something else." Fortuitously, he was let go from his job shortly after that point. Ryan then took the Clifton StrengthsFinder, and it resonated with him. He saw it as a tool to help others and knew the science behind the assessment was irrefutable. 


Monday, February 15, 2016

StrengthsQuest: Coaching Others Starts with Knowing Yourself


by Becky McCarville


“He who knows others is wise; he who knows himself is enlightened.” -- Lao Tzu


Transformative. Powerful. Energizing.


These are the words used by participants who have completed Gallup’s Accelerated Strengths Coaching course and the Successful Strengths Coaching module.


Coaching others is the goal for many who pursue certification as a Gallup-Certified Strengths Coach. But few anticipate the potential impact the courses will have on them as they work toward becoming certified. The intensive, immersive process -- which involves varied learning experiences and setting actionable individual and professional goals -- can be transformative.


Discovering Strengths


There are two learning paths to becoming a Gallup-Certified Strengths Coach: completing three separate two-day modules toward certification (Successful Strengths Coaching, Coaching for Individual Performance and Coaching Managers and Teams), or completing the Accelerated Strengths Coaching program, an intensive, four-and-a-half-day course that consolidates Gallup’s two-day courses.

Sunday, February 14, 2016

[GWSW] Belief: Motivation Ignited by Values

People with strong Belief talents have enduring principles by which they live. These values vary from one person to another, but those with powerful Belief talents have deeply held ideals and a strong sense of purpose in their lives. These core values affect their behavior in many ways. Their sense of mission gives their lives meaning and direction; in their view, success is more than money and prestige.



Please register for our Belief Webcast on Thursday, February 18, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. EST. Please download the Theme Thursday Companion Guide for Belief here to follow along with the show!










Saturday, February 13, 2016

[Analytical S2] Taking Information to the Lowest Common Denominator


On this Theme Thursday Season Two webcast, Jim Collison, Gallup's Director of Talent Sourcing, and Maika Leibbrandt, Gallup Advanced Learning and Development Consultant discussed the theme of Analytical.





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Analytical seeks the truth by understanding the components of what the rest of the world sees as an assumption. Analytical loves data and numbers, but this love is an affect of Analytical -- not the core of it. The core of Analytical boils things down to their lowest common denominator. People talented in the Analytical theme engage easily with the elements of an idea. They don't take things at face value. Analytical breaks information down into smaller pieces than anyone else might see. It captures facts by understanding the details. Analytical is always searching for reasons and causes. People with Analytical can help others become clear on what excellence is and how it can be obtained.  



Friday, February 12, 2016

[Adaptability S2] Engaging with Change Enthusiastically


On this Theme Thursday Season Two webcast, Jim Collison, Gallup's Director of Talent Sourcing, and Maika Leibbrandt, Gallup Advanced Learning and Development Consultant discussed the theme of Adaptability.





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People with high Adaptability engage with change enthusiastically. Adaptability likes to be "in the now" and the present moment -- it is a relationship-building theme. People exceptionally talented in the Adaptability theme like to go with the flow. Adaptability discovers the future one day at a time. People with Adaptability don't need to plan far in the future because they prefer to plan for the immediate present. They are excited and energized by change. They are attracted to a morphing situation.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

[Recap] Self-Awareness and Strengths

On a recent Called to Coach, we spoke with Gallup-Certified Strengths Coach, Lopamudra Das.









Since childhood, Lopamudra was interested in self-discovery. Despite this keen interest, Lopa often struggled to understand her behavior. Lopa was introduced to the Strengths movement a few years ago -- and learning about and understanding her strengths has made her journey to self-discovery easier and more meaningful. Lopa found catharsis in her self-awareness through strengths -- it has helped her be comfortable with her natural talents.

Sunday, February 7, 2016

[GWSW] Arranger: Bringing People, Processes and Productivity Together

Arrangers are conductors. When faced with a complex situation involving many factors, people with strong Arranger talents enjoy managing all of the variables, aligning and realigning them until they are sure they have arranged them in the most productive configuration possible. Those who have high Arranger talents work tirelessly to implement a solution. They get things done by orchestrating, organizing, and facilitating the work of others. Arrangers are people of multiplicity, thriving on bringing together people, processes, and products to build productivity.


Please register for our Arranger Webcast on Thursday, February 11, 2016 at 12:00 p.m. EST. Please download the Theme Thursday Companion Guide for Arranger here to follow along with the show!










Friday, February 5, 2016

[Activator S2] Impatient is not a Bad Word

On this Theme Thursday Season Two webcast, Jim Collison, Gallup's Director of Talent Sourcing, and Maika Leibbrandt, Gallup Advanced Learning and Development Consultant discussed the theme of Activator.





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Activators are always thinking, "Let's get started. Let's go." They are impatient for action, but that impatience is not a negative thing. It represents Activators innate ability to energize and mobilize others to act. People talented in the Activator are comfortable with risk, as long as action is taken. Activators are catalysts -- they turn ideas into action. When other people share ideas, Activators are listening for openings in those ideas for action. Their energy can be engaging and contagious.

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

[Recap] Strengths Develop Infinitely

On a recent Called to Coach, we spoke with Gallup's Talent Development Architect, Dean Jones.








Dean will be a guest on Gallup webcasts approximately every 6-8 weeks during 2016. He will discuss the concepts and constructs that exist behind Gallup learning courses. He hopes to address misconceptions about strengths-based developments and to ensure Gallup's research supports Gallup-Certified coaching practices.

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Strengths Based Parenting: Know Your Children's Strengths


By Mary Reckmeyer, PhD, Author of Strengths Based Parenting, Available for Purchase here.


Everyone knows a kid like Tom.


Tom was the two-year-old who threw a temper tantrum just because. Maybe it was because his mother looked at him the wrong way or he wasn’t allowed to put the sugary cereal in the grocery cart, or he didn’t want to take a bath.


He became the eight-year-old who was afraid of dogs -- even really small ones. Later, he was the teenager who wouldn’t touch the gourmet meals his mom prepared and who thought fast-food burgers were the only food worth eating. He was the high school student who often found better things to do than attend all of his classes.


Tom’s issues are common -- but how much time and energy would you put into solving his “problems”?