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Friday, September 21, 2018

Aligning Your Job and Your Life -- Driving Employee Engagement (Q08) -- Gallup Called to Coach: Mike McDonald (S6E37)

On this special edition of Called to Coach, we will spend time investigating the experiential, emotional and empirical aspects of each element of Gallup's Q12 engagement instrument and learning how it increases the power of our coaching as a primary driver of success. This series will be hosted by Dr. Mike McDonald, Senior Workplace Consultant at Gallup, who started at Gallup in 1990 as a manager/team leader and has had a variety of roles but has always led a team. One of his primary concerns for managers is one that he’s experienced himself: How many well-intentioned team leaders are there who are working really hard but don’t have any coaching or context about engagement and how do they lead to engagement through their strengths?





In this session, Mike talks about Q08 -- "The mission or purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important." Below is a summary of the conversation. Full audio and video are
posted above. 

Host Jim Collison: Mike McDonald is our host today. He works as a Senior Workplace Consultant here on the Riverfront. Mike, welcome back to another Called to Coach.

Guest host Mike McDonald: We’re ready to go, Jim. We’re starting to get into the rarified air of the higher order of engagement. I think this is going to stretch all of us.

JC: I agree with you. This is one of the first ones where it’s not necessarily the manager or even the person. It really transcends the idea of even team. Talk about the question and the resources available.

MM: Today we’re talking about Q08 of our 12. It’s “The mission or purpose of my company makes me feel my job is important.” It’s interesting to think about the mission (or purpose) of my company -- one segment -- and then makes me feel my job is important. How do we drill down and make this statement come alive on a daily basis that will drive engagement?

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Input -- Limitless Capacity to Collect and Archive Information -- Theme Thursday Season 4

On this Theme Thursday Season Four webcast, Jim Collison, Gallup's Director of Talent Sourcing, and Maika Leibbrandt, Senior Workplace Consultant, talk about Input





People exceptionally talented in the Input theme have a craving to know more. Often they like to collect and archive all kinds of information. They are always absorbing for future squeezing. People with Input high have a limitless capacity to gather and collect information. They have a radar for external credibility, not just trusting their gut.

A Comparison of CliftonStrengths and the Kolbe Index

By Adam Hickman and Mary Claire Evans



Coaches today face a variety of assessment choices, all claiming to result in understanding and to create transformative discussions about personality traits. In this blog, we delve into the history, as well as the similarities and differences, of two widely used assessment tools -- the Kolbe Index and the CliftonStrengths assessment.

Kolbe Theory

Kathy Kolbe started Kolbe Corp in the 1970s but had been researching and implementing her theories on human instincts long before this era. She began her career helping elementary and high school students of all ability levels. In 1977, Kolbe founded the Center for Critical and Creative Thinking, which eventually would expand its mission and focus to working with adults and change its name to Kolbe Corp. Her framework for discovering students’ approaches to learning was developed into an instrument to measure the instinctive action and problem-solving styles of individuals.

Kolbe’s theory begins with the concept of a three-part mind: affective (or feeling), conative (or doing) and cognitive (or thinking). The Kolbe Index measures the conative part of the mind that, in theory, contains the striving instincts that drive a person's natural way of taking action. Innate conative strengths are then applied when individuals engage their thinking (cognitive) and feeling (affective) parts of the mind.

Friday, September 14, 2018

Giving Your Employees a Voice -- Driving Employee Engagement (Q07) -- Gallup Called to Coach: Mike McDonald (S6E36)

On this special edition of Called to Coach, we will spend time investigating the experiential, emotional and empirical aspects of each element of Gallup's Q12 engagement instrument and learning how it increases the power of our coaching as a primary driver of success. This series will be hosted by Dr. Mike McDonald, Senior Workplace Consultant at Gallup, who started at Gallup in 1990 as a manager/team leader and has had a variety of roles but has always led a team. One of his primary concerns for managers is one that he’s experienced himself: How many well-intentioned team leaders are there who are working really hard but don’t have any coaching or context about engagement and how do they lead to engagement through their strengths?







In this session, Mike talks about Q07 -- "At work, my opinions seem to count." Below is a summary of the conversation. Full audio and video are posted above. 

Host Jim Collison: Mike McDonald is our host today. Mike, welcome to Called to Coach.

Guest host Mike McDonald: Jim, it’s kind of an adrenaline rush and ride. 

JC: This next question, Q07, and I say this about all of them, it’s really important. When we think about employees and their opinions, this is really hard and at the same time really easy. One of the major parts of my job is to help people’s opinions count. What is the full question and what does it mean?

MM: Jim, should we have a moment -- we’re celebrating a record. The U.S. is experiencing a tie for its all-time high of employee engagement. Drum roll … it’s 34%. Ties our record high.


JC: Mike, it’s just one (percentage point) -- from 33% to 34%. What does that really represent?

MM: We broke out our calculators and Googled some things, and found out there are 134 million workers in the U.S., so 1.3 million more people woke up this morning and were excited and looking forward to the work they were going to do and the people they were going to do it with.


So how do we make the 1.3 million tangible? Dallas has about 1.3 million people. Imagine the city of Dallas waking up and loving what they do and the people they’re doing it with. It takes hundreds of millions of touchpoints to move the needle on that. So Jim and I are excited that we think we are trending, and maybe can take this country and planet toward a tipping point of engagement.

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Individualization -- Differences As Advantages -- Theme Thursday Season 4

On this Theme Thursday Season Four webcast, Jim Collison, Gallup's Director of Talent Sourcing, and Maika Leibbrandt, Senior Workplace Consultant, talk about Individualization





People exceptionally talented in the Individualization theme are intrigued with the unique qualities of each person. They have a gift for figuring out how different people can work together productively. Those with high Individualization are very present with people for who they are and not what they are a part of or how they are associated.

Monday, September 10, 2018

Good Grief, It’s Time to Invest in Strengths

By Tim Simon




Since 1950, Charles Schulz’s “Peanuts” characters have delighted millions of children and adults. The comic strip’s hero, Charlie Brown, is a gentle and kindhearted character often depicted as shy and full of anxieties. In one memorable scene, Charlie states, “I’ve developed a new philosophy. I only dread one day at a time!”

Charlie’s mindset can be found in many workplaces. In a 2009 interview, Tom Rath, coauthor of Strengths Based Leadership, stated, “On average, spending time with your boss is consistently rated as the least pleasurable activity in a given day.” In the words of “Peanuts” character Linus: “Good grief!”

The good news, according to Rath, is that in organizations with leadership that focuses on the strengths of employees, the odds of being engaged go up about eightfold. He then states, “So it’s important that leaders focus on employee strengths because maybe the most critical part of their job is helping others uncover their strengths.”

Friday, September 7, 2018

Development: The "Silver Bullet of Success" -- Driving Employee Engagement (Q06) -- Gallup Called to Coach: Mike McDonald (S6E35)

On this special edition of Called to Coach, we will spend time investigating the experiential, emotional and empirical aspects of each element of Gallup's Q12 engagement instrument and learning how it increases the power of our coaching as a primary driver of success. This series will be hosted by Dr. Mike McDonald, Senior Workplace Consultant at Gallup, who started at Gallup in 1990 as a manager/team leader and has had a variety of roles but has always led a team. One of his primary concerns for managers is one that he’s experienced himself: How many well-intentioned team leaders are there who are working really hard but don’t have any coaching or context about engagement and how do they lead to engagement through their strengths?







In this session, Mike talks about Q06 -- "There is someone at work who encourages my development." Below is a summary of the conversation. Full audio and video are posted above. 

Host Jim Collison: Mike McDonald is our host today. Mike, good to see you on Called to Coach.

Guest host Mike McDonald: Jim, good to see you.

JC: We are talking about Q06 today. And I always say, “This is a really important one.” But this one’s got some special twists to it as we think about engagement.

MM: You’re right, Jim. This element demands a lot of attention. This item starts to sort true manager talent vs. managers who can (only) follow rules and guidance and instruction. This separates what we would call a “great manager” (from the rest).

Includer -- Acceptance of Others -- Theme Thursday Season 4

On this Theme Thursday Season Four webcast, Jim Collison, Gallup's Director of Talent Sourcing, and Maika Leibbrandt, Senior Workplace Consultant, talk about Includer. 





People exceptionally talented in the Includer theme accept others. They show awareness of those who feel left out and make an effort to include them. They are slow to judge or assume, and quick to invite.

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Mastery Monday: Productive Aiming -- Includer (2018)

By Albert L. Winseman, D.Min

“Teamwork makes the dream work!” This quote is music to the ears of those with Includer in their Top Five. For them, building a winning team means ensuring that everyone on the team feels valued and respected, and that their voice is heard -- this fosters collaboration. They are always on the lookout for others they can bring into the team who can add value by providing a new perspective. Includers have a strong aversion to being left out -- whether it is themselves or others. Consequently, they look for outsiders and seek to make them insiders. Because they hate feeling out of the loop, they ensure that others are up to speed and in the know. Strong Includers also tend to be very tolerant and accepting of a variety of perspectives, life experiences and belief systems. This can make them advocates for those who might be overlooked by majority points of view. Diversity is something to be not only celebrated, but also included. We are stronger together.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Talk to Me: Caring Through Proactive Conversations -- Driving Employee Engagement (Q05) -- Gallup Called to Coach: Mike McDonald -- S6E34

On this special edition of Called to Coach, we will spend time investigating the experiential, emotional and empirical aspects of each element of Gallup's Q12 engagement instrument and learning how it increases the power of our coaching as a primary driver of success. This series will be hosted by Dr. Mike McDonald, Senior Workplace Consultant at Gallup, who started at Gallup in 1990 as a manager/team leader and has had a variety of roles but has always led a team. One of his primary concerns for managers is one that he’s experienced himself: How many well-intentioned team leaders are there who are working really hard but don’t have any coaching or context about engagement and how do they lead to engagement through their strengths?







In this session, Mike talks about Q05 -- "My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person." Below is a summary of the conversation. Full audio and video are posted above. 

Host Jim Collison: Mike, welcome back to another Called to Coach!

Guest host Mike McDonald: Jim, it is a blast; you’re creating an addiction here. I love the “deep dive” and the immersion approach we take to engagement.

JC: Q05 is where it gets personal, talking about the dynamics of a relationship. Let’s dig in, but we have some prework to do.

MM: Q05 is “My supervisor, or someone at work, seems to care about me as a person.” And we want to share the resources we’ll be referencing throughout our discussion.